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  1. #101
    Brand New Egg Holli's Avatar
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    Wow, so much information in one place. Just what I was looking for.

    We actually got our Quaker a few months ago, and his personallity has improved with us.

    Many of the points you made, described him specifically. Hense, the name Sassy. But, I learned that he likes routine. He knows when it is time to come out, and yes - he is so protective of his cage, we actually have to wear a glove for him to step-up on. He loves coming out. He knows his "glove" and when he sees it, he will meet you at the door. When he doesn't get out when he knows it is time, he will scream to remind us.

    He loves his jungle gym and knows he gets nutriberries when he is playing on it. He doesn't get nippy when he out.

    So, as long as we stick to his routine, I believe him to be as sweet as my conures.
    "...Laughter is timeless. Imagination has no age. And dreams are forever." (Disney)


  2. #102
    Brand New Egg anthrogirl80's Avatar
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    My friend is wanting to breed her quakers (bonded pair - bought that way for breeding purposes) and then take and tame one of the babies for herself and sell the others.
    I am going to print this and give it to her. Hopefully she'll change her mind and take one of the baby princess parrots she has instead!

    I was going to wait for a Quaker from her, but man am I glad I decided a cockatiel was for me! Now I'm ready to take a 'step up' in the parrot world, but I'll be staying away from Quakers. Thanks so much for this informaton! I wish we had a thread like this for all species!

  3. #103
    Tailfeather javi's Avatar
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    quakers have their faults they make up for it with alll their positives. i love my dexter
    Life without birds, is not a life I could live

  4. #104
    Hatched! Buttons the Quail's Avatar
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    Quakers are certainly interesting. They make mega nests in the wild (I don't know if they do it in captivity too) it's really cool.


  5. #105
    My Evils Egg's Cracking... AvianMom's Avatar
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    I agree, they do have their faults, but they do make up for it. Mine is 10 months old, ive had him since 8 weeks. Just thought id add a bit of input

    Loud? YES. Mika can be very loud and demanding when he wants attention. Hes been known to flock call/scream for hours unless i go get him out of the bird room. He has no interest in other birds. He only wants me or my husband.

    Cage territorial? Not to me. EVER. I can do whatever i want in his cage. But he hates change. If i start moving things around he makes his "angry" noise at me, but hes never bit me. He IS however territorial to other birds being near his cage. But alot of times he actually walks over to my tiels and doves cage, and hangs out in there with them! Hes never caused any trouble.

    Highly Active? YES. Mika is always up to something and gets bored very easily. He REFUSES to be locked in his cage while were at home. Of course he never is. But if im even one min late getting there, hes already throwing fits lol.

    Obesity? I heard this before purchasing a quaker, and i must admit i had seen several that were just round balls LOL. I got Mika on an all pellet diet with a little bit of seed mixed in from time to time as a treat. So far he stays around 98-100 grams.

    Tempermental? He does have his moments. Hes never bitten..ever. But there are times where he doesnt want to be bothered, and will push my hand away when im trying to get him to step up. So i give him his space, but usually when he sees me leaving, hell cry "COME HERE!!" and then hop on

    One person bird? Im not too sure about this one. So far Mika loves both me and my husband (altho it is starting to favor to me) but hes never lashed at my husband. Hell just try and fly over ot me if im nearby. Strangers? Hell go to anyone. He LOVES attention.

    Talking? YES. Mine started talking at 4 months old and never stopped. Hes extremely intelligent and quickly picks up on words AND their meanings. He knows my husbands name and calls for him when he knows hes home. "Eric? Eric!" When hes tired he says "go night nights!" and crawls into his sleepy tent. (hes the only bird i have that puts himself to bed!!" When I ask him for kisses, hell make a huge kissy noise then say to himself "good babyyy!" He is super smart, and never ceases to amaze me.

    All birds have flaws. But i trully love my quaker to bits. He is my husbands favorite bird..and this is coming from a non bird lover. Mika really has him wrapped around his little talon lol.

  6. #106
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    I have to agree with this. I acquired an adorable little quaker parrot because her owner passed away. She hated her owners widow so she was sent to my school and put up for grabs for anyone who wanted her... well she decided that she wanted ME! So I brought her home without knowing what to expect at all. I have read all the information I could get my hands on and am a little more educated now. Kramer screams, screeches, and gets even if she is not let out of her cage at around the same time each day. She tolerates other people but makes it very clear that I am hers. I had to go out of town for 3 weeks and she had to stay with my Dad and she is still working out her anger issues with that whole situation. At the same time she can be the sweetest bird you have ever met. She talks up a storm and I am currently trying to get her to stop saying a few certain words that some of the people at school thought it would be fun to teach her. She soaks everything up and it is a lot like having a 2 or 3 year old child around. I certainly don't regret taking Kramer home she is a wonderful contribution to my family, but everyone in my house has had to make several changes to accomodate Kramer.

  7. #107
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    Wow, I am glad I never read anything like this years ago when I lived in Virginia and Quakers weren't illegal like they are in Tennessee.

    I know that most quakers can be loud, cage agressive, possessive, etc., etc., but mine must have been the exception since I never had any of those problems with him and he was such a sweetheart. At the time I had tiels and green cheeks. My quaker actually babied, preened and protected the rest of the flock. They slept together, ate together and sang together. He was loud at times, but normally it was when the tiels and gcc were off doing something else and he wanted them home. He never bit anyone, he never bonded to just one of us and at the time my kids were very young. He would get vocal about two times a day and was the love of my life. If I'd read this post, which back then there was no such thing, lol..............I would never have gotten my wonderful green quaker. When he died, it was from old age, he refused an all seed diet and loved to share salads with us as a family as well as eating his seeds. I'm sorry, but I really think it is wrong to label quakers as being hard birds to handle. So many parrots share the same characteristics, it is an insult to quakers to consider them a difficult parrot to own. I had one long before the internet and all the info available now. I'd give alot to have him back, but he lived a long healthy life and I was blessed to have him.

    This is of course just my two cents, but I would hate for someone to not buy a quaker because of the negative aspects of this post. The best thing you can do is make sure you have just one, not two or three or more, then you do have problems...........and not every bird is created equal.
    "She was not quite what you would call refined. She was not quite what you would call unrefined. She was the kind of person that keeps a parrot." Mark Twain

    1 Cockatiel: Bandit
    1 White Capped Pionus: Cotton
    2 Sun Conure : Pebbles and Petrie
    2 Normal GCC: Winkie and Tiki
    1 Pineapple GCC: Patches
    1 Cinnamon GCC: Cricket
    1 Yellowsided GCC: Angel
    1 Quaker: Dusty
    1 BlackCapped Conure: Olive

  8. #108
    Egg's Cracking...
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    people should also be aware that quakers are illegal to own in many states. They are illegal in calif. so if u get one and you plan to move to another state that your in you may not be able to take the quaker with you
    as for loudness they are not the only paarrots that make loud noises nor or they the only parrots that pluck. the african gray are also known to be pluckers
    in short one should first research research on any breed of parrot they are thinking of bring home before they bring it home
    just curious sounds like you really dont like the breed
    Linda

  9. #109
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    Thanks so much for posting this! It's been very helpful and I'm glad it was tagged (pinned?).

  10. #110
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    another concideration about owning a quaker is that they are illegal to own in many states and should u move to another state you may not be able to take your quaker with you
    Linda

  11. #111
    Lost Quaker Parrot Brand New Egg
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    Our quaker parrot flew out the door on December 10th in St. Petersburg, Florida and were hoping that who ever finds her and thinks wow this a cool bird because of her vocabulary and antics will soon realize she is a bully and a handfull too.

    She loved my boyfriend, cuddled with him, truely adored him. I would have to use a dishtowel to pick her up or she would bite me. I had a totally different relationship with Ivy, I would sing to her and she would sing back. I would talk to her and sometimes she couldnt mumble fast enough to try to keep up with me. We would talk and play for hours literally.

    My boyfriend on the other hand was passionatley harassed by her 10 hrs a day. She would follow him from room to room and hang out on him sometimes trying to hump him. Funny thing about men, they dont like being humped by birds. Me, I thought it was cute and hysterical.

    I have a teenage son who tried to show her who was boss and the bird won. She would dive bomb him and his friends and scream anytime he got near her. If you have a teenager you know they have no patience and with the bird and him acting like two year olds it was difficult at times.

    I have to say that bird brought me great pleasure though. Being the only girl in the house, oh besides my cat nala, this bird would sing and talk and play with me and was the thing I most looked forward to when I came home every night to play with. Men and teenagers dont like to play, but that quaker parrot could keep me entertained for hours.

    She was a bully too. I have an akita husky named Blue and the kitty named Nala. My cat has always been very good about respecting moms other pets and knew hunting Ivy was a no no. There would be times that crazy little bird would march into our kitchen right past the dog and cat and hop up on the dogs water bowl and lunge at the dog and cat daring them to do anything. She would dip her little toe into the bowl making sure the water was not to chilly and the would proceed to bath herself in the dogs water. My poor other pets would just look at me like "whats up with this mom" lol.

    At times Ivy rode the dog and the cat. I have to say I was very surprised that my cat was so nice about that. Ivy was trying to bite her and I had to rescue the cat not the bird. What a handful.

    Every Saturday and Sunday she would wake up with the sun and start to CHIRP. The Quaker Parrot chirp is not a happy little sound its an ear piercing sound that will disrupt everyones sleep. Again, for any of you with teenagers out there, being awakened on Sat or Sun by the Chirp, was not a happy time in our house as our son would start screeming at the bird to shut up. Quakers dont shut up when they dont want to. In fact, the more you tell them to be quiet the more they will let you know who the boss is.

    Each weekday, Ivy had a schedule, She would demand cereal, usually lucky charms first thing. If my boyfriend was to slow getting her breakfast she would pace back and forth on the top of her cage shifting her head from side to side in contempt for his slowness. It was hysterical.

    We had toys in her cage but found that the thing she loved the best were sticks from outside. I would gather 10-20 sticks and she would be thrilled to engineer them through her cage for hours at at time. She would lock herself in the cage with her engineering but loved it none the less. She didnt want anyone getting near her or her cage while she was engineering and took this very seriously.

    She would fly from the living room across the house to the kitchen and we would laugh as it certainly was not the "normal" kind of house we were living in.

    I cant tell you how much I miss this bird. I could cry myself to sleep every night without her. I know that someone has found her as she is such a junk food junkie. I am sure the first day out on her own she was moody that she didnt have her lucky charms. I know her well enough to know she would find someone just for the food part of the program. I am sure they are thinking Wow this is a cool bird, she has a huge vocabulary, including kitty kitty, meow meow. I still think having a bird that says that is the funniest thing ever. We taught her to bark like a dog and play peek a boo. She says Hi poopie, Wake up, bye bye, see you later, come here, and sings two songs with me. She loves to exagerate the notes and sings like an opera singer. I miss singing with her as my boys wont sing with me.

    If you hear of anyone that has found a quaker please let me know at [email] Suellen123@aol.com. I have an ad posted on Craigs list and Parrot911 alert and the St. Petersburg times and am praying to get her back. Until I get her back my pillow will be drenched with tears every night. God Bless.
    Last edited by Suellen123; 12-31-2009 at 11:52 AM.

  12. #112
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    I hope you find your quaker. I was sad to see one listed on Craigslist for the tenth time today. "talks and bites" was what the ad said.

    I do want a bigger parrot some day but i am leery of the noise factor. They are cute little guys though.

    $40 with cage included. I wish I knew someone that would take him in. I wish I had the knowledge to be that person...

  13. #113
    Rawr Brand New Egg SunshineJenn03's Avatar
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    I absolutely love Quakers. I had a handicapped Quaker for nearly ten years (you would never have known she was handicapped!) and when she passed, my ex brought home a baby Blue QP who is the most social, friendly Quaker I've ever seen.
    If you regularly expose them to new things and people, you can keep them from getting "Quaker-itis" as I like to call it. She's almost two years old and not cage territorial or bitey. She loves everyone, even strangers, the dogs, the cat, the neighbors. You just have to be consistent with them for their entire lives or they become, well, Quakers.
    Yes, they are noisy, but that's because they are truly flock birds and want to be social with anyone at home. They don't tolerate being ignored.
    I could go on forever on the positives of having a Quaker, because they far outweigh the negatives IMO. But that would take all day.

  14. #114
    Suffering from MBS Egg's Cracking...
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    I wouldn't trade my 2 quakers for the world. Zeus is 4 yrs old and Zoey is 17 months old. My female is a little cage territorial but not to the point of her ripping your finger off. Although she is a totally different bird when away from her cage. She's a real cuddler and still at 17months of age still purrs and bobs her head. She also talks a lot more then my other one. Zeus my male is the complete opposite to Zoey. He's not ever been cage territorial. He is just a real sweetie. He love pretty much everyone and everything. He's been to bird shows and a pet exhibit. Everyone there couldn't believe how calm he was and how he'd just go to anyone. Even kids as young as toddlers were holding him and he didn't seem to mind.

    Quakers are not for everyone but I agree if you have the time, money, space and can handle their screams then go for it. Just do your research first.

  15. #115
    Brand New Egg tripletrouble's Avatar
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    I'm glad I found this thread and am thankful I haven't had a bad experience. I've had my Yoshi for about a month or so and I love him dearly. He is eight months old.

    Noise: He does the scream when my toddler roars at him. They go back and forth, roaring at each other. He also does it if the house is very loud and he gets overstimulated. Other than that he will do a call once in a while if he wants out of his cage. I work full time so all my guys are caged during the day. But once I'm home, they're all out playing and getting into trouble.

    Attitude: He loves attention - by anyone. He isn't fond of the kids and will growl when they come near. He's never bitten any of them and has made no attempts. He just stays away from them, but heck if you were a foot long and a bunch of huge wild toddlers ran around crazy could you really blame him? He is very social with adults and will step up for anyone. He loves rubs and kisses. He gives the best kisses.

    Biting: He's never tried to bite. He preens my cuticles a lot, but I distract him with shred toys.

    Aggression with other birds: This is one area I've seen to be true. He is very territorial with other birds. He doesn't come at any of the others, but if they come near him he will cry at them and start a beak war. I just know to give him a time out for being aggressive and tell him "no fight". He doesn't ever attack any of them, but he will guard his space from them.

    Intelligence: So far, he has only learned to master laughing and kissing noises. He picks on my friend Marie because she is always awkward around him. She is squeamish around birds and critters that aren't dogs. So she doesn't feel comfortable getting close to him. He senses this and will sqwak at her for attention. When he does that, she announces: "Yoshi! Don't you yell at me!" very loud, so he'll do that loud scream at her. One night, they went back and forth like that and as she was leaving, she told him "Stop screaming!" and he screamed at her again and as she opened the door to leave, he started laughing at her. I thought it was hilarious. Anyway, other than that, he tries to mimick but hasn't quite mastered other things. Just needs practice. He does love figuring things out, seeing how to take things apart. I'm glad he hasn't figured out how to open his own cage door... yet.

    I will say this. He is extremely affectionate. He will fall asleep in my lap as I rub his little head. And anyone who is sweet to him will experience what a love he is.
    ~Jasmine~

    **Corwin** Cockatiel
    **Patrick** Cockatiel
    **Yoshi** Quaker Parrot

  16. #116
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    Quote Originally Posted by NeapolitanSixth View Post
    Lately, it seems like Quaker Parrots are growing in popularity. I know two of you have/are considered/considering getting one. Erin is our quaker person here, but I thought I'd toss in my two cents on this issue too, since I live with one...I just wanted to give you some more info, from someone who kind of had no choice but to live with a quaker's point of view.

    This post isn't meant to specifically target any members, but it is the result of my repeated experience with people who want quakers. Also, you may think to yourself; Well, all birds can do this, but the truth of the matter is, Quakers are more prone to these behaviors than most other birds.

    Quakers are popular because, as a breeder put it; They talk, and they're cheap; They are fluffy and can be taught to do tricks, and are an attractive shade of green, blue, or yellow. Who wouldn't want one?

    Honestly, if I wanted something that talked that badly, I'd opt for the friendly telemarketer that calls at dinner before I got a quaker. Plus he's free, and requires no maintenance!

    You've read all the great stuff about Quakers, now it's time for the bad things that land them in rescues.

    Quakers are loud. I've mentioned this many times before, but I really cannot say it enough. When you go to pick up your new baby, he will probably be making adorable little purring sounds at you, nodding his cute fuzzy green head, as if to say, I love you too! Maybe for the first few days, or the first week, even, your baby will keep purring at you curiously, and will vocalize soft little, crra? crra? question sounds lovingly. But, when he decides to unleash his flock call, it is as if Zeus himself has unleashed a thunderbolt upon the roof of your home. And if he is on your shoulder, forget about it, unless you enjoy the sound of your eardrums popping. I used to work at an all-bird store, with birds you know and love, and a bunch of other species you'd probably not know, but would still love. Quakers by far were the loudest, and yes, there were macaws, cockatoos, conures, and amazons in there too. The volume maybe wasn't as loud (but they could still give the larger birds a run for their money..,proportionately, imagine if they were that size!) but the continuous noise was loud, and then they would get all the other birds calling too, causing a general racket. If you have more than one bird, beware of this. However, you have to understand that most birds that are good at talking are generally very chatty and loud.

    I live in an apartment with my quaker Bosco. My building is quite sound-proof, and so far I've had no complaints about loud bird noise. Still, I worry that someday I'll have an upset neighbor. Because quaker live in huge colonies in the wild, they 'flock call' a lot, and are used to having their family around them. If you get a quaker, be aware that they may start yelling and making a racket every time you leave the room or are out of their sight. If you're ok with noise: good. If not, think quaker ownership through very carefully before-hand.

    Quakers are highly active and intelligent. Why is this bad, you may ask. It just means they need that much more attention and toys, which for you equals time and money. Without a good amount of time (I'd say 3+ hours) and a huge variety of toys to play with and destroy, they can develop really bad, destructive behaviors, that include biting you quite hard for what seems like no reason (which of course there is), destroying your furniture, blinds, and molding (among other things), excessive screaming (in addition to the normal chatter), and general vengefulness. Also, my next point...

    Quakers love their toys! They enjoy toys they can chew up and destroy, and sometimes will weave parts of their toys through the cage bars, as if building a 'nest'. Quakers can get cage-territorial and aggressive about 'their space.' They need supervised out-of-cage play time every day. Quakers are not birds who are content and happy being in a cage 24/7. You need to make plenty of time for them every single day.

    Quakers are prone to feather plucking and other forms of self mutilation. They're right up there with those gorgous, cuddly, "Everyone wants me!" cockatoos. This results from not enough one-on-one time, and boredom. It is a serious problem (another one of our members is dealing with the affects of a neglected quaker right now, I'm sure she'll have something to say as well) and difficult to correct.

    Quakers are prone to obesity. All seed diets should be avoided in all birds, but it is especially important to offer Quakers a variety of food. The good news is, most are brave enough to try new things, but you have to be consistent in offering it, and you have to make sure you take the new food away within 4 hours, if perishable, or you can open up a whole new host of problems. Quakers will gorge themselves especially if bored. After all, what would you do to a bowl full of chips if you were stuck in a small room, with not enough stuff to do?

    Quakers are prone to fatty liver disease. A lot of good quaker owners will, at their yearly avian-vet 'well birdy checkups', have the vet draw blood and check the bird's liver enzimes. This is an especially good idea if the quaker is overweight, or has been a 'fatty-food' eater. This doesn't mean a quaker shouldn't have any seed in their diet..they certainly can have seed. But monitor it carefully, and like Nikki said, they need fresh, healthy foods each day.


    Quakers are temperamental. They are always testing their boundaries, usually with really painful bites. When improperly trained, they become unmanageable, and that's when people leave them in their cages to pluck themselves bare. Also, like I said before, they can be really vindictive. Sometimesn if I let my roommate's Quaker out later than he's used to when she has an especially busy day, he will march out with the most determined look on his face and bite hard enough to draw blood. Because of their intelligence, they remember and let you know. This is one of the reasons they are bad birds for a family with small children. If not properly handled by the child, a quaker can leave permanent scars--both physical and mental.

    Quakers can become one-person birds. Even when socialized well, Quakers generally do become possessive, one-person birds. They are not the best birds to just pick up and show off to your friends, as your friends may get nailed pretty badly. This is yet another reason that quakers aren't the best family birds. They will pick a favorite and might not be too nice to the rest of your human flock.

    If you get a baby quaker, and you want him to be a well-socialized bird, you need to start working with him when he's young. Having the quaker spend time with the whole family (being careful of little children's fingers etc.), can help your quaker become a well-adjusted bird. However, there is still no guarentee. A quaker who is well-socialized and lives in a home where the owners have done everything right, may still grow up to be a one-person bird. That's just how some birds are.

    Quakers are aggressive towards other birds. While he is curious about the other birds in our apartment, I don't trust my roommate's quaker to even play with them, even with supervision. He will make a beeline for my Conure, head down, mouth open. My 55 gram Conure thinks he is about 10 feet tall when it comes to these things, so he will try to charge back. Well, both of them are quick, and the Quaker actually put a significant indent in my Conure's beak. Had we not tried to separate them, he would have succeeded in splitting the Conure's beak in two--this was definitely not a quick nip type of situation. He was holding on for good. All the Conure did was have the audacity to sit on my shoulder within view, but he was near the Quaker's territory, and we've all learned not to let that happen again.

    Don't let your quaker play with birds of other species. The results can be very tragic. I've heard story upon story of birds losing their toes (or worse) because of a quaker. "Birds of a feather flock together"...'nuff said.


    I love the Quaker I live with, but my roommate is lucky because not everyone does. If I had the chance to go back in time and choose some other bird for her, I'd have probably gone with something else. My boyfriend, my super patient tolerant boyfriend, who helps me care for my green cheek conure, rescue pionus, rescue lovebird, bourke's, and cockatiel, has made me promise never to have a Quaker because of the above reasons, so that should say something. Even when you have the money and time, don't just think of yourself when buying a bird, think of those who you live with, the ones you love and care about.

    I love Bosco and wouldn't trade him for all the money in the world. But he can be a handful at times, and he keeps me on my toes. I am a single person who lives alone, and Bosco (and my tiels) fit in well with the lifestyle I have chosen. Please remember, if you are considering a quaker, that they can live to be over 30 years old, and they deserve the best life you can get them, which means they always deserve your love and attention, no matter what may change in your own life. Quakers are big commitments. They are extraordinary, special, wonderful birds. But they aren't for everyone.


    -Nikki


    **********
    Nikki has mentioned some very important points. I've added my opinions/points to this post in green font. Thanks, Nikki, for putting this together.
    --Erin CG


    I was just reading your post on Quaker Parrots. You can say that again about Quakers being noisy. They are not just noisy. They are also obnoxious. I have two quakers and a budgie, but one of my quakers gets so noisy for no reason than to be noisy. There are plenty of toys in his cage and straws that I give for him to weave through the bars and I could be doing something and he goes into this loud vocalization, it gets so unbearable. He also gets the other quaker started and then gets the budgie started. You can imagine the noise level. To keep them quiet, I have to resort to spraying them, if only for an hour and when that doesn't work, I pull down their covers and pull the shades down and leave them in a semi-dark room, until they settle down.

  17. #117
    Brand New Egg NordicPrincess's Avatar
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    To keep them quiet, I have to resort to spraying them, if only for an hour and when that doesn't work, I pull down their covers and pull the shades down and leave them in a semi-dark room, until they settle down."

    Why would anyone do this? I mean it's only natural for the bird to vocalize. If you do not want a noisy pet, do not get a bird.
    Bird= communication = community. And if you do not have time for them obviously they are going to act out. You cannot just stuff them in a room away from their flock because it's going to create anxiety for more than obvious reasons.

    Please understand that there are other methods to get a bird to calm down. For example you could get them interested in something else. I know the noise level with a quaker can be unbearable momentarily but if you can direct their attention towards another stimulant it will stop.

    I had two blue quakers who did this, normally it was when I was out of the room. When I went to investigate it would get louder but when they saw me they would stop. If they didn't stop, I took them into another room with a different environment and different stimulants such as food/toys/tv and human interaction.

    As stated in the post quakers do need alot of attention and they are stated as having the mind of a 2-3 yr old human. They love to forage, climb curtains, rip wall paper off the wall, destroy wooden toys, dump things over, build nests, shred newspaper for nesting, share food, make happy with the cage or your hand, projectile poop on the walls, dip their food in water, then poop in their water as if it were a toilet, attack dogs, attack people, protect their territory and/or their mate, attack feet, fluff to be loved, purr when they enjoy something, swinging back and forth on ropes, play with cell phones, awed by Lady GAGA, and the list goes on and on and on....

  18. #118
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    So what kind of bird do u suggest? I have an eclectus parrot and I'm looking for another bird that is loveable sweet friendly talkative and playful but not loud and obnoxious??
    Danielle, mommy of 5 year old male Eclectus Parrot

  19. #119
    Breeding SandraK's Avatar
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    Danielle, the post you're answering goes back aways - the post before yours is from April 2010. Quakers can be friendly, talkative and playful but they are also loud and obnoxious sometimes. All three types of birds I have do have their loud & obnoxious times - intensity varies and also depends on how much noise the humans involved can handle. I'm going to try to record some of my birds when they're making noise so that you can have an idea of what I'm talking about.

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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    Hi! Did I have the only sweet Quaker? Maybe a matter of interpretation. Archie (for Archimedes, Merlin's familiar -- but Archie proved to be a lady), my first bird. We learned each other: She was cage territorial, but that just meant show a little respect when you invite her to come out. On the same theme, she was fiercely territorial: for example, when a hyper-active friend friend followed me into the kitchen to "help", Archie got down and marched 30 ft to stand in between us to give him the evil, protective stance. I loved her company, but moved her and had some long hard work hours, but she was tough. Loud? Probably, but not like any bigger parrot. Never had her chew anything like my grey can demolish a good carpet. But loved to beak-wrestle. Best story: she got out and flew up into a 50' tree and kept inviting me to "C'mere, c'mere", After a day, she came down to the neighbor's roof and though terrified of heights I got up there and she walked nonchalantly to my hand.

    Maybe it helped that she was bred in a clutch by 2 vet students trying to make a living, and I was well warned of traits she never developed.
    Cheers, Quaker lovers!

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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    I wanted to get a quaker and got a parrotlet. Still wanting a quaker I got a canary winged parakeet *bee bee parrot*
    I don't want a quaker any more!
    The bee bee parrots are similar but not as loud. Thank God for that!!

  22. #122
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    I have a Quaker and she is one of the sweetest birds I've ever owned.I got her as a baby and finished hand feeding her myself so she bonded with me.She is quieter than my Lovebirds and only calls when she wants me otherwise she is busy building her nest over and over again.We just give her sticks and she is happy to keep building.I had another Quaker years ago that I hand fed also and she was really sweet too.I think Quakers would be a good first parrot for someone experienced with lovebirds or cockatiels.In Canada Quakers are not cheap to buy as they cost anywhere from $550.to over $800. in some pet stores in my area.
    Last edited by annakaranina; 01-02-2014 at 01:50 PM. Reason: forgot something to say

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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    Hi, Carol, and welcome to the community! Has your Quaker ever laid eggs? I think it would be neat to sit and watch her make her nest with the sticks. Hope to see you around the forum!

  24. #124
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    I wished California allowed Quakers to live here, they are such beautiful birds. Lucky you to own one Carol.
    Fly Free Boomer, we will forever love you.

  25. #125
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    Re: The Problem With Quakers

    I have a green cheek conure he is lovely but is very noisy when he wants attention he has a sqwark I can only describe as a scream I too was told by the shop that green cheek conures were quiet birds. I have got used to his noise within reason but the cheekyness and the way he is with the family override the noise problems.

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