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  1. #1
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    Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Are my Canaries ready to be put in the same cage? They've known each other for about 2 days. They are in separate cages. When I put one of the Cages farther away they both get crazy and start chirping. Sometimes the male Canary sings. My male Canary always tries to get as close as he can to the female Canary.
    My male and female Canary also kind of looks bored/sad he just stands there and tries to get close to the female. When I didn't have the female he'd fly everywhere. Now he just stands. Should I put them together in the same cage? Also can they use sowing string (String to sow clothes or make) , paper towel, newspaper for the nest? Please help!
    Thanks !

  2. #2
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Manuel, First question is, do you have room or want babies. A normal nest is between 3 to 6 eggs which could obviously yield 3 to six more birds. They will do this again, or continue to try, as long as you let them. Meaning 2, 3 or 4 clutches of eggs. One pair can do this and you can end up with generally, 10 or more birds from one pair in one year. You obviously cannot and should not breed these birds together after that since they are related. Also do not, I repeat do not see dollar signs, you will not make money and you will have trouble getting rid of them. Think hard about this and start reading everything you can on breeding.
    Your questions where (as you described his actions) are true to nature. It is breeding season now and he wants to mate, so he will do whatever it takes to be with the female. He will act the way you describe as well as sometimes get loud and agitated, meaning flitting around his cage. All because he wants to mate. Birds don’t think, they just react to hormones and want to go for it. Unlike humans, they feel it and cannot consciously stop it. If you want young, read everything first, then put them together. If not don’t. I am going to yield to your other question that you’re going too. No judging here, I just really don’t recommend this unless you have studied everything about the process. This is for the bird’s sake more than yours. Many things can go wrong, most deadly, others not so much, but specifics that can be avoided by just educating yourself. Again I am not judging, but anyone who reads up on breeding would realize and be instructed to never use thread for this process. Anything that can get tangled around a bird’s leg “will”. At the minimum it will cause a lifelong deformity, at worst death. There are many nest materials on the market, I recommend: go to http://www.abbaseed.com/ and then to nests and nesting materials, items SJC05 or AVM171, either are good. The nests that are showing on the front page next to nesting material are very good as well. Get some next inserts for them and then nesting material.
    Now hopefully, by just saying the few things I have it will make you really stop and think about all you will need to do/get before you proceed. Of course nature has been doing all of this on its own for thousands of years, but thousands die every year because of not doing it right. Hey, you came here and asked questions, good start. The best book I recommend for you is, Canary Tails by Linda Hogan. Type that in your web browser and by it. It will have everything you will ever need in it if you follow her instructions/recommendations.

  3. #3
    Brand New Egg
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    Manuel
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5borders View Post
    Manuel, First question is, do you have room or want babies. A normal nest is between 3 to 6 eggs which could obviously yield 3 to six more birds. They will do this again, or continue to try, as long as you let them. Meaning 2, 3 or 4 clutches of eggs. One pair can do this and you can end up with generally, 10 or more birds from one pair in one year. You obviously cannot and should not breed these birds together after that since they are related. Also do not, I repeat do not see dollar signs, you will not make money and you will have trouble getting rid of them. Think hard about this and start reading everything you can on breeding.
    Your questions where (as you described his actions) are true to nature. It is breeding season now and he wants to mate, so he will do whatever it takes to be with the female. He will act the way you describe as well as sometimes get loud and agitated, meaning flitting around his cage. All because he wants to mate. Birds don’t think, they just react to hormones and want to go for it. Unlike humans, they feel it and cannot consciously stop it. If you want young, read everything first, then put them together. If not don’t. I am going to yield to your other question that you’re going too. No judging here, I just really don’t recommend this unless you have studied everything about the process. This is for the bird’s sake more than yours. Many things can go wrong, most deadly, others not so much, but specifics that can be avoided by just educating yourself. Again I am not judging, but anyone who reads up on breeding would realize and be instructed to never use thread for this process. Anything that can get tangled around a bird’s leg “will”. At the minimum it will cause a lifelong deformity, at worst death. There are many nest materials on the market, I recommend: go to http://www.abbaseed.com/ and then to nests and nesting materials, items SJC05 or AVM171, either are good. The nests that are showing on the front page next to nesting material are very good as well. Get some next inserts for them and then nesting material.
    Now hopefully, by just saying the few things I have it will make you really stop and think about all you will need to do/get before you proceed. Of course nature has been doing all of this on its own for thousands of years, but thousands die every year because of not doing it right. Hey, you came here and asked questions, good start. The best book I recommend for you is, Canary Tails by Linda Hogan. Type that in your web browser and by it. It will have everything you will ever need in it if you follow her instructions/recommendations.
    Yes I do know what I am getting myself into. I'm honestly not looking forward to selling them. Some of my
    family members want Canaries so I would like to breed mine and give them (Family) the chicks. If theres were too many chicks I will try to sell the remaining ones to a great breeeder thay I know. Also I love watching animals! I would love to be a breeder or vetenerian when I grow up! I love animals I used to have Chickens and I would buy them when they were 3 days old and take care of them. I love farm animals! I'm just really worried yanno'? I guess it's just cause I'm scared something bad will happen. I've had canaries before and tried to let them breed but I didn't do the right steps because I didnt really read anything online I just f

  4. #4
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5borders View Post
    Manuel, First question is, do you have room or want babies. A normal nest is between 3 to 6 eggs which could obviously yield 3 to six more birds. They will do this again, or continue to try, as long as you let them. Meaning 2, 3 or 4 clutches of eggs. One pair can do this and you can end up with generally, 10 or more birds from one pair in one year. You obviously cannot and should not breed these birds together after that since they are related. Also do not, I repeat do not see dollar signs, you will not make money and you will have trouble getting rid of them. Think hard about this and start reading everything you can on breeding.
    Your questions where (as you described his actions) are true to nature. It is breeding season now and he wants to mate, so he will do whatever it takes to be with the female. He will act the way you describe as well as sometimes get loud and agitated, meaning flitting around his cage. All because he wants to mate. Birds don’t think, they just react to hormones and want to go for it. Unlike humans, they feel it and cannot consciously stop it. If you want young, read everything first, then put them together. If not don’t. I am going to yield to your other question that you’re going too. No judging here, I just really don’t recommend this unless you have studied everything about the process. This is for the bird’s sake more than yours. Many things can go wrong, most deadly, others not so much, but specifics that can be avoided by just educating yourself. Again I am not judging, but anyone who reads up on breeding would realize and be instructed to never use thread for this process. Anything that can get tangled around a bird’s leg “will”. At the minimum it will cause a lifelong deformity, at worst death. There are many nest materials on the market, I recommend: go to http://www.abbaseed.com/ and then to nests and nesting materials, items SJC05 or AVM171, either are good. The nests that are showing on the front page next to nesting material are very good as well. Get some next inserts for them and then nesting material.
    Now hopefully, by just saying the few things I have it will make you really stop and think about all you will need to do/get before you proceed. Of course nature has been doing all of this on its own for thousands of years, but thousands die every year because of not doing it right. Hey, you came here and asked questions, good start. The best book I recommend for you is, Canary Tails by Linda Hogan. Type that in your web browser and by it. It will have everything you will ever need in it if you follow her instructions/recommendations.
    Yes I do know what I am getting myself into. I tried breeding canaries before but I just followed my parents rules. Which of course they didn't breed or anything. This time I've read online done research and everything. Finally I got my male Canary for my birthday on Saturday. Then I bought a female Canary Monday. They're separated right now. I put them together yesterday and the female didn't like the male Canary with her and she was biting him and chasing him so I separated them. I'm just worried you know? I'm optimistic I think of the bad things that would happen. Like what if they don't like each other?! What if they don't build the right nest?! What if they don't mate?! You get me? It scares me. But I love seeing animals have children! No matter what animal it is! I think I'd like to be a breeder or a vet. Can canaries make their nest with only Newspaper, Paper towel, Toilet paper? I don't really have burlap or those nesting material you were talking about. I don't know if they sell them where I live ( they sell burlap at Walmart though.) . I'm really just scared about them building the nest and when to know when to put them together.

  5. #5
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Sorry about the first message. Don't read that one I messed up.

  6. #6
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    Rudi
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Manuel, Most of the large box type pet store also carry nexting material. Look them up and call them if there is not a bird specific store in your area. The best material if you can not get it would be toilet paper. Tear up a bunch in small pieces and line the nest with it. Place a bunch in the nest and use your fingers to push it down and make like the nest should be, (lower in the center and then up around the edges. I always make the nests for my birds. They will either use it or rearrange it them selves. Problme is a lot will start throwing the stuff out and rearrange it or just throw it out, which can be frustrating. They will then lay their eggs in an unprotected nest only. This sets the young and adults up for getting their feet caught in the holes or whatnot. Remember if your birds are young, meaning first season ever breeding, they will make mistakes just as you will. Be prepared for heart ache and frustration. Nothing is worst than wanted to help and you can not do anything. They have been doing this for longer than us humans have been around. Breeders have done it for so long we know what to do or rather what problems to eliminate so these problems won't occur. Even then they will. Three thing will occur in general. The eggs will be infertile and never hatch, 2- The parents will be bad parents and the young won't make it, 3- you'll get young besides problems. Give them a nest so they don't lay in the food dish. Give them the tissue paper, they will tear some themselves and let them lay. MAke sure she has calcium w/Vitamin D3 or cuttlebone at the least. They need calcium, the egg making really zaps this from them so they need to replenish it. Egg binding is serious and can occur when they do not get enough. A hen struggling at the bottom of the cage, mouth open and visual in distress is a direct response to low calcium. If she does not get some when in this state she usually will not make it. LAstly read a lot, as much as you can, and follow what you can. Nestling food is different then regular food. The young will need it, most will be listed on the web as egg food reciepies or nestling food. Most stores carry pre made egg food, Cede is probably the one most big box stores carry. Quicko and Abba make some as well. Give it dry, do not add water in your case, and change it daily. Do not over feed it and when breeding is complete discontinue the use of it. Coucous and Quinoa are also good, your after after the protien content. Obviously young need protien to form strong , well everything. Again, read as much as you can and ask question on specifics if what is written does not make complete sense. You will be learning as your birds do as well. Be patient and be ready for set backs and heart ache. It come with doing what your going to do. We breeders lose many babies every year for one or many reasons. It happens in captivity or the wild, part of life, we can only try our best to give them what they need.

  7. #7
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5borders View Post
    Manuel, Most of the large box type pet store also carry nexting material. Look them up and call them if there is not a bird specific store in your area. The best material if you can not get it would be toilet paper. Tear up a bunch in small pieces and line the nest with it. Place a bunch in the nest and use your fingers to push it down and make like the nest should be, (lower in the center and then up around the edges. I always make the nests for my birds. They will either use it or rearrange it them selves. Problme is a lot will start throwing the stuff out and rearrange it or just throw it out, which can be frustrating. They will then lay their eggs in an unprotected nest only. This sets the young and adults up for getting their feet caught in the holes or whatnot. Remember if your birds are young, meaning first season ever breeding, they will make mistakes just as you will. Be prepared for heart ache and frustration. Nothing is worst than wanted to help and you can not do anything. They have been doing this for longer than us humans have been around. Breeders have done it for so long we know what to do or rather what problems to eliminate so these problems won't occur. Even then they will. Three thing will occur in general. The eggs will be infertile and never hatch, 2- The parents will be bad parents and the young won't make it, 3- you'll get young besides problems. Give them a nest so they don't lay in the food dish. Give them the tissue paper, they will tear some themselves and let them lay. MAke sure she has calcium w/Vitamin D3 or cuttlebone at the least. They need calcium, the egg making really zaps this from them so they need to replenish it. Egg binding is serious and can occur when they do not get enough. A hen struggling at the bottom of the cage, mouth open and visual in distress is a direct response to low calcium. If she does not get some when in this state she usually will not make it. LAstly read a lot, as much as you can, and follow what you can. Nestling food is different then regular food. The young will need it, most will be listed on the web as egg food reciepies or nestling food. Most stores carry pre made egg food, Cede is probably the one most big box stores carry. Quicko and Abba make some as well. Give it dry, do not add water in your case, and change it daily. Do not over feed it and when breeding is complete discontinue the use of it. Coucous and Quinoa are also good, your after after the protien content. Obviously young need protien to form strong , well everything. Again, read as much as you can and ask question on specifics if what is written does not make complete sense. You will be learning as your birds do as well. Be patient and be ready for set backs and heart ache. It come with doing what your going to do. We breeders lose many babies every year for one or many reasons. It happens in captivity or the wild, part of life, we can only try our best to give them what they need.
    Thanks! Could I message you when I have issues? You're the only one that answers my questions.

  8. #8
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    I would prefer it here. I have done that before and since I do not know you, in the past private messages have been a bad event. Nothing personal, I have just had one very bad experience the other way, and honestly, the private message thing is frustrating to navigate. Ask away. I do suggest again getting Linda Hogans book, or joining her website. I know her and she is one of the nicest people as well as canary breeder/show judge and speaker on everything canary. Her book will be in your hands in about a week for less than $25 total. I must admit, most of us learn exactly the way you are going. We read as much as we can and follow their guide. The rest is keeping notes on everything, or in avian/biologist you name it in regard to animal behavior, observe/note and evaluate. This takes patience and the acknowlegment that things will go wrong and we will lose some, but what did we learn and how can we adjust and do better. Many people here and everywhere get extremely angry at us for this. Their hearts are in the right place, but practicality and advancements for all come from mistakes and learning to befit all and move us forward. History is filled with mistakes, we eveluate and learn from them. It is funny how Robert Stroud, the Birdman of Alcatraz, a convicted killer, advanced canary and bird health issues leaps and bounds. Until his work no one had gone that deep into the what's, why's and hows of Canary Diseases and treatments. From a prison cell he observed, documented, adjusted, tested, attempted many things, failed and succeded and beside his lack of education, learned and documented then shared and advanced avain digagnosis and treatments. The avain vetranairian field has grown but still behind say all other animals. It is just now or in the last 20 years began to grow and specialize. Some of the biggest advancements in canaries, came from a single person seeing something or doing something and bringing it forward. Say the red color in all red factor canaries, was a hybrid cross between a red siskin and a canary. This cross was attempted many times to finally get a bird which was not sterile or in avain speak a mule. Mules by definition are horses and donkies being cross bred creating a mule. Mules then are generally always sterile/infertile or un able to produce young. In birds mule may take many generations or attempts to get a bird that is fertile. When this occured the red color genetically was bred in. So this is known in the canary fancy as the introduction of the red factor as we know it now. This also is how every breed we now have came about, Glosters with their crested, Frill of all kinds, Stafford, Yorkshires, Gibers and Scotts. Remember, all canary's in the wild, (Canary Islands, origin) are green, many years of crossing and the first mutation to just yellow, was bred over and over until varigation and melinine was breed out allowing for the lipochrome gene to come forward. I said a lot here, all in the attempt to hopefully stear you into history, genetics and why our birds are what they are today and where they and the people who created them started and are now. It is fasinating and a lot of fun but takes knowledge, patience and a lot of hard work. You can find mostly everything I eluded too on the web. Just look and learn, I promise you if you are open to it, you'll really have fun.

  9. #9
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5borders View Post
    I would prefer it here. I have done that before and since I do not know you, in the past private messages have been a bad event. Nothing personal, I have just had one very bad experience the other way, and honestly, the private message thing is frustrating to navigate. Ask away. I do suggest again getting Linda Hogans book, or joining her website. I know her and she is one of the nicest people as well as canary breeder/show judge and speaker on everything canary. Her book will be in your hands in about a week for less than $25 total. I must admit, most of us learn exactly the way you are going. We read as much as we can and follow their guide. The rest is keeping notes on everything, or in avian/biologist you name it in regard to animal behavior, observe/note and evaluate. This takes patience and the acknowlegment that things will go wrong and we will lose some, but what did we learn and how can we adjust and do better. Many people here and everywhere get extremely angry at us for this. Their hearts are in the right place, but practicality and advancements for all come from mistakes and learning to befit all and move us forward. History is filled with mistakes, we eveluate and learn from them. It is funny how Robert Stroud, the Birdman of Alcatraz, a convicted killer, advanced canary and bird health issues leaps and bounds. Until his work no one had gone that deep into the what's, why's and hows of Canary Diseases and treatments. From a prison cell he observed, documented, adjusted, tested, attempted many things, failed and succeded and beside his lack of education, learned and documented then shared and advanced avain digagnosis and treatments. The avain vetranairian field has grown but still behind say all other animals. It is just now or in the last 20 years began to grow and specialize. Some of the biggest advancements in canaries, came from a single person seeing something or doing something and bringing it forward. Say the red color in all red factor canaries, was a hybrid cross between a red siskin and a canary. This cross was attempted many times to finally get a bird which was not sterile or in avain speak a mule. Mules by definition are horses and donkies being cross bred creating a mule. Mules then are generally always sterile/infertile or un able to produce young. In birds mule may take many generations or attempts to get a bird that is fertile. When this occured the red color genetically was bred in. So this is known in the canary fancy as the introduction of the red factor as we know it now. This also is how every breed we now have came about, Glosters with their crested, Frill of all kinds, Stafford, Yorkshires, Gibers and Scotts. Remember, all canary's in the wild, (Canary Islands, origin) are green, many years of crossing and the first mutation to just yellow, was bred over and over until varigation and melinine was breed out allowing for the lipochrome gene to come forward. I said a lot here, all in the attempt to hopefully stear you into history, genetics and why our birds are what they are today and where they and the people who created them started and are now. It is fasinating and a lot of fun but takes knowledge, patience and a lot of hard work. You can find mostly everything I eluded too on the web. Just look and learn, I promise you if you are open to it, you'll really have fun.
    It's okay I understand!
    Thanks, could you give me the link to her website please?
    I've been reading a lot about canaries lately I hope the first clutch come out all healthy

  10. #10
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    No problem, her site is: http://canarytales.blogspot.com/ or just type in Canary Tails and her name again is Linda Hogan

  11. #11
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5borders View Post
    No problem, her site is: http://canarytales.blogspot.com/ or just type in Canary Tails and her name again is Linda Hogan
    Thanks! I will try to find the book at the library. Also will canaries not breed If the cage is small? Or it doesn't matter to them?

  12. #12
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Oh yes, I just checked their vents and they are both red. Does the males vent appear red and isn't their something coming our from the hole? Or is it just red cause my males is just red. My hens is also red. If both of their vents are red then why aren't they mating? :'( Is it cause they don't have enough space? I have a bigger cage but it only has 1 perch and a swing. I feel like they won't have enough space to move around. Should I just put them in their or just leave them in the same space? I feel like if I move them they'll get mad and well get out of their comfort zone and they're going to take time to get used to the new cage.

  13. #13
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    OK, please do not take what I will say as yelling at you, that is not my intent. Now, these are the things I was speaking about before you started. Everyone or anyone, bringing in to their home, any pet or creature, they should learn everything they can before they do it. The question of what you want from it and then how do I care for it, thus get everything necessary, should be done ahead of time. Please for your birds sake, put them in a cage at least 16”L x 12”W x 12”H. Place the perches so they can move around and the food dishes were they cannot poop in them. Place the nest on the back or side, again were they can’t poop in the food dishes from the nest, then leave them alone, unless they need help or you are cleaning or changing food and water. The more you move them, mess with them, handle them or bother them, the more stressed they will be. If they lay eggs, you will stress them and she will sit to tight and she could die because she will protect the eggs and not eat. OR She will never sit tight out of fear of you and thus the eggs will never incubate and you will lose them.
    During mating or breeding season, the hen when in condition will look different than the male. She will have what is called a breeding patch. Her abdomen will be flat and a little extended, exposed do to the feathers parting and pinkish and warm. If you hold a hen upside down and blow gently on her feather, the patch will be revealed. If she does not have one, she is either a make or not ready for breeding. The make will have a small spikey protrusion with feathers on it. OK yes, that is his sexual organ and it only becomes prominent during breeding. Otherwise both sexes look pretty much the same when not in breeding condition. Breeding condition is generally triggered by 13 hours of light. Temperature and food do help but mostly lighting.
    I do not know if her book is in any libraries, but most all books on canaries, will talk about breeding and the differences and needs. Obviously everyone has their own ideas and ways of doing things but they all pretty much follow the basic principles. The biggest reason people have trouble breeding, and the biggest cause of problems, are lack of preparation and human interference. The people, who interfere or hover, stress the birds and they react badly, physically and psychologically. If a giant kept coming into your room and kept sticking his hands all around, grabbing you and never leaving you alone, you’d be scared to death. They get used to us, but they have to trust us and that comes by treating them with respect and leaving them alone as much as possible. You can be near them, talk to them, clean their environment and feed them. But do it consistently at scheduled times and the same way. They get used to that and what to expect from you. The biggest thing is they get to know you won’t harm them. This is long because you’re beginning to worry me. All will work, just take time and let them do their thing. Feed them the best you can, change their water every day, read as much as you can, watch and observe, take notes. My biggest worry is you’ve put the cart before the horse. Meaning your breeding before you know what to do, or even what the signs are to look for and what they mean so you can give them what they need. Patience and knowledge are the two biggest things you and your birds need.

  14. #14
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5borders View Post
    OK, please do not take what I will say as yelling at you, that is not my intent. Now, these are the things I was speaking about before you started. Everyone or anyone, bringing in to their home, any pet or creature, they should learn everything they can before they do it. The question of what you want from it and then how do I care for it, thus get everything necessary, should be done ahead of time. Please for your birds sake, put them in a cage at least 16”L x 12”W x 12”H. Place the perches so they can move around and the food dishes were they cannot poop in them. Place the nest on the back or side, again were they can’t poop in the food dishes from the nest, then leave them alone, unless they need help or you are cleaning or changing food and water. The more you move them, mess with them, handle them or bother them, the more stressed they will be. If they lay eggs, you will stress them and she will sit to tight and she could die because she will protect the eggs and not eat. OR She will never sit tight out of fear of you and thus the eggs will never incubate and you will lose them.
    During mating or breeding season, the hen when in condition will look different than the male. She will have what is called a breeding patch. Her abdomen will be flat and a little extended, exposed do to the feathers parting and pinkish and warm. If you hold a hen upside down and blow gently on her feather, the patch will be revealed. If she does not have one, she is either a make or not ready for breeding. The make will have a small spikey protrusion with feathers on it. OK yes, that is his sexual organ and it only becomes prominent during breeding. Otherwise both sexes look pretty much the same when not in breeding condition. Breeding condition is generally triggered by 13 hours of light. Temperature and food do help but mostly lighting.
    I do not know if her book is in any libraries, but most all books on canaries, will talk about breeding and the differences and needs. Obviously everyone has their own ideas and ways of doing things but they all pretty much follow the basic principles. The biggest reason people have trouble breeding, and the biggest cause of problems, are lack of preparation and human interference. The people, who interfere or hover, stress the birds and they react badly, physically and psychologically. If a giant kept coming into your room and kept sticking his hands all around, grabbing you and never leaving you alone, you’d be scared to death. They get used to us, but they have to trust us and that comes by treating them with respect and leaving them alone as much as possible. You can be near them, talk to them, clean their environment and feed them. But do it consistently at scheduled times and the same way. They get used to that and what to expect from you. The biggest thing is they get to know you won’t harm them. This is long because you’re beginning to worry me. All will work, just take time and let them do their thing. Feed them the best you can, change their water every day, read as much as you can, watch and observe, take notes. My biggest worry is you’ve put the cart before the horse. Meaning your breeding before you know what to do, or even what the signs are to look for and what they mean so you can give them what they need. Patience and knowledge are the two biggest things you and your birds need.
    Oh okay thanks

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Manuel_E View Post
    Oh okay thanks
    Oh my males vents is just kind of red theres nothing coming out or anything. My hen on the other hand looks like she is ready. I read on the internet that if the hen is ready and is placed with a male that isn't she will stop being in the breeding mode. Also it says that she will also biker which my hen is always fighting with my male ever 2-4 days! She was fighting with him today. She always starts it though? Would this be why? My hen is also stands on the food for a long time or sometimes drops some on the floor. ( this is also showing she is ready.)

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    I am glad you went on line to verify what the male and female look like when in breeding mode. They do look completely different, but do remember the male may or not be ready, even if the hen is. Usually the male comes into readiness first and thru his stronger than usual song assists bringing her fully into it. If they fight, this could be normal or a problem. Normally if they are not ready they may fight a bit. This can be sharing space and just establishing themselves. Meaning, what they will accept or not, simple socialization of how each wishes the other to act. They also may not like each other, or be unsure. It takes time for them to accept each other sometimes and this will pass or it can get worst. Not all will accept the other. Sometimes a pair will not get along for many reasons and nothing you can do will change that. This is something you just have to watch and see. Most of the time that will settle out and they will be fine, but again in about 5% of birds they will never get along. Do also remember to mate, she may turn him away if he is not doing things right, IE he is not ready and she knows it. There is a specific courtship they do. Not pronounced like other birds, but he must do certain things to bring her into accepting him. She will also do things to tell him what she wants or when she is ready. If she is ready and he is not or he is ready and she is not, sometimes they will fight. When she is ready or accepts him she will usually move around erratically until she lowers her head, flits her wings, gently vocalizes, and presents her rear end in the air with her tail feathers lifted. This can be subtle or very pronounced. This tells him she is willing and he then will jump on her back and in a second or two be done. It will happen so fast you will think nothing happened, or can take a few more seconds which you can’t miss. Some pairs this event can happen all at once very quickly and appear as if they are fighting, but in truth he must hold her down and claw into her back for support to mate. This obviously looks like a fight or attack, simply because if it was an attack it would actually happen the same way. If she on the other hand does it to him, she is demonstrating dominance and this may work its way out or cause problems.
    Good Luck

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5borders View Post
    I am glad you went on line to verify what the male and female look like when in breeding mode. They do look completely different, but do remember the male may or not be ready, even if the hen is. Usually the male comes into readiness first and thru his stronger than usual song assists bringing her fully into it. If they fight, this could be normal or a problem. Normally if they are not ready they may fight a bit. This can be sharing space and just establishing themselves. Meaning, what they will accept or not, simple socialization of how each wishes the other to act. They also may not like each other, or be unsure. It takes time for them to accept each other sometimes and this will pass or it can get worst. Not all will accept the other. Sometimes a pair will not get along for many reasons and nothing you can do will change that. This is something you just have to watch and see. Most of the time that will settle out and they will be fine, but again in about 5% of birds they will never get along. Do also remember to mate, she may turn him away if he is not doing things right, IE he is not ready and she knows it. There is a specific courtship they do. Not pronounced like other birds, but he must do certain things to bring her into accepting him. She will also do things to tell him what she wants or when she is ready. If she is ready and he is not or he is ready and she is not, sometimes they will fight. When she is ready or accepts him she will usually move around erratically until she lowers her head, flits her wings, gently vocalizes, and presents her rear end in the air with her tail feathers lifted. This can be subtle or very pronounced. This tells him she is willing and he then will jump on her back and in a second or two be done. It will happen so fast you will think nothing happened, or can take a few more seconds which you can’t miss. Some pairs this event can happen all at once very quickly and appear as if they are fighting, but in truth he must hold her down and claw into her back for support to mate. This obviously looks like a fight or attack, simply because if it was an attack it would actually happen the same way. If she on the other hand does it to him, she is demonstrating dominance and this may work its way out or cause problems.
    Good Luck
    Oh okay. I think my hen is demonstrating dominance she always bosses the male around and gets first dibs. I asked a breeder named Michelle on e-mail and she said that, that is normal. Is it? Also is it still considered mating if the male just tries to mate when her but then he fails an then they begin to fight? Cause that what my first ever canaries did. I thought that was but the nest wasn't even built nor was their a egg the next day.

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Today the male tryed
    mating with the hen but she wouldn't let him. I've noticed that the male I belive is trying to feed the hen I don't know if the hen accepts the food or not but she makes this weird notice and opens her wings. Then the male chirps quietly I don't know if she doesn't want his food? Or is just what they do when the male feeds her? But twice this turned into a fight. I've tried looking it up online but there's nothing.

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Manuel_E View Post
    Today the male tryed
    mating with the hen but she wouldn't let him. I've noticed that the male I belive is trying to feed the hen I don't know if the hen accepts the food or not but she makes this weird notice and opens her wings. Then the male chirps quietly I don't know if she doesn't want his food? Or is just what they do when the male feeds her? But twice this turned into a fight. I've tried looking it up online but there's nothing.
    Tried* noice* sorry about that.

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Manuel_E View Post
    Tried* noice* sorry about that.
    Noise* well also I just noticed that the hen is also opening her wings. I read on the Internet (before I bought my canaries) that this is a sign. The male tried mating with her also. But does this mean he's in breeding condition? If they both are why aren't they building a nest? They've been in the same cage for almost 2 weeks. I think I should give them more time. But how do you know if they don't like each other? Oh yes! I also already put a nesting pad on the nest since Wednesday. The temperature is at 72 (online it says it should be about 64-74.) and I kind of think it's the lighting. I uncover their cages at 6:30 A.M or 7 until 10:00 P.M but the their is no more light till 7 P.M , and it usually comes out at 7 A.M. Time went forward one hour just last week.
    Shouldn't their be 13 hours of sunlight instead of 12? On the Internet it says they need about 10-13 hours of sunlight. Would this be okay? I mean they wouldn't be in breeding mode if they didn't get enough light right? Lol

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    It is not unusual for a pair to fight. You are correct it is usually a dominant female who won’t accept the male with her. If she is opening her wing, head down, mouth open, squawking at him vocally, while facing him, yes that is a full demonstration of get away or we’ll fight. If she turns away from him, opens her mouth, vocalizes, with her head down and rear end up, while fluttering her wings, she is inviting him. Now remember she may allow him to mate and then begin fighting again. Some birds do this. Not good but it will work its way out after she begins laying. Also remember, when they mate, what you will see if very brief, maybe a total of 2 -4-5 seconds long. He will jump on her back and in seconds jump back off. This can happen many times throughout the day, or just once. The building of the nest is no sign of breeding readiness or anything but lack of skill. Some birds are great nest builders and others, well. They have no clue. Some even will make a mess out of a perfectly good one you make for them, thus why a nest pad is good. The nest pad is there in case everything else fails and she lays, the eggs and young will be ok. You are also correct about the lighting and timing. For a successful breeding state, you must have a minimum of 13 hours. Temperature does not matter as long as it is warm enough to protect the eggs/young from chills. The temperature for bringing them into breeding does not really mater. It helps but is a big factor. Always think about nature. When spring is on us, the temperatures begin to get warmer, the sunlight begins becoming longer and everything outside begins to bloom and more food of all kinds is now available. All of these changes trigger birds to breed, but the light is the most important signal. Lastly, and I am not saying this is the case, but general rules go out the window when you’re talking about individuals. Every bird and every person have their own personality. So I have seen females that do what yours is doing and fall into place and everything’s fine. I have also seen females who will not accept any male except to mate and then don’t want him around, but there are females who will never accept a male no mate what. I had one last year I placed 7 different males with her, she killed one and fought with everyone I gave her. Needless to say I do not have her anymore.

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5borders View Post
    It is not unusual for a pair to fight. You are correct it is usually a dominant female who won’t accept the male with her. If she is opening her wing, head down, mouth open, squawking at him vocally, while facing him, yes that is a full demonstration of get away or we’ll fight. If she turns away from him, opens her mouth, vocalizes, with her head down and rear end up, while fluttering her wings, she is inviting him. Now remember she may allow him to mate and then begin fighting again. Some birds do this. Not good but it will work its way out after she begins laying. Also remember, when they mate, what you will see if very brief, maybe a total of 2 -4-5 seconds long. He will jump on her back and in seconds jump back off. This can happen many times throughout the day, or just once. The building of the nest is no sign of breeding readiness or anything but lack of skill. Some birds are great nest builders and others, well. They have no clue. Some even will make a mess out of a perfectly good one you make for them, thus why a nest pad is good. The nest pad is there in case everything else fails and she lays, the eggs and young will be ok. You are also correct about the lighting and timing. For a successful breeding state, you must have a minimum of 13 hours. Temperature does not matter as long as it is warm enough to protect the eggs/young from chills. The temperature for bringing them into breeding does not really mater. It helps but is a big factor. Always think about nature. When spring is on us, the temperatures begin to get warmer, the sunlight begins becoming longer and everything outside begins to bloom and more food of all kinds is now available. All of these changes trigger birds to breed, but the light is the most important signal. Lastly, and I am not saying this is the case, but general rules go out the window when you’re talking about individuals. Every bird and every person have their own personality. So I have seen females that do what yours is doing and fall into place and everything’s fine. I have also seen females who will not accept any male except to mate and then don’t want him around, but there are females who will never accept a male no mate what. I had one last year I placed 7 different males with her, she killed one and fought with everyone I gave her. Needless to say I do not have her anymore.
    Yes that is what she does! Well thanks I haven't had any problems so far so that's great. They haven't fought. But I put in some nesting material in their nest today in the morning when I came home it was on the cage floor. Does this mean anything? they always just play with the materials.

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    No, that's normal. Some use it and some play with it. No two are the same. Just take a clip of somesort and clip the material to the side or front of the cage. They will grab what they want and use it or not. The pad you put in will work if they do not actually make a nest. It is up to them. Don't worry to much if you put the pad in. Some pairs or even individuals wil tear apart a nest over and over. Some will make a perfect nest and never touch it again. It varies. Also, very important for health reasons. When the babies hatch out, they should be fed by Mom and Dad. If all goes well and this occurs, the babies will poop, obviously they should as we all do. For the first 5 to 8 days, (differs so no general rule of days) the Mom will eat the poop. This is instictive and she should do this. It is actuallya left over natural instict from the wild. It keeps the nest clean and keeps the smell down, thus not alerting preditors to their location. When you see her stop doing this and and poop starting to accumulate around the edges of the nest it is time to band you young. Now if you are not going to put leg bands on your young, fine, no worries. The poop will begin to accumulate around the edge because the young are now bif enough to get their butts over the edge but mostly miss. This is also the time you should have a clean nest ready. Gently take out the nest with babies in it. Quickly place them in the new clean nest and place the new nest with babies back in. I suggest doing this late in the evening before their bed time. After you do that place some new food in the cage or top off their food. The hen or parents will see the food, forget about the disturbance, begin feeding the young in the new nest and all will go to sleep.

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5borders View Post
    No, that's normal. Some use it and some play with it. No two are the same. Just take a clip of somesort and clip the material to the side or front of the cage. They will grab what they want and use it or not. The pad you put in will work if they do not actually make a nest. It is up to them. Don't worry to much if you put the pad in. Some pairs or even individuals wil tear apart a nest over and over. Some will make a perfect nest and never touch it again. It varies. Also, very important for health reasons. When the babies hatch out, they should be fed by Mom and Dad. If all goes well and this occurs, the babies will poop, obviously they should as we all do. For the first 5 to 8 days, (differs so no general rule of days) the Mom will eat the poop. This is instictive and she should do this. It is actuallya left over natural instict from the wild. It keeps the nest clean and keeps the smell down, thus not alerting preditors to their location. When you see her stop doing this and and poop starting to accumulate around the edges of the nest it is time to band you young. Now if you are not going to put leg bands on your young, fine, no worries. The poop will begin to accumulate around the edge because the young are now bif enough to get their butts over the edge but mostly miss. This is also the time you should have a clean nest ready. Gently take out the nest with babies in it. Quickly place them in the new clean nest and place the new nest with babies back in. I suggest doing this late in the evening before their bed time. After you do that place some new food in the cage or top off their food. The hen or parents will see the food, forget about the disturbance, begin feeding the young in the new nest and all will go to sleep.
    On okay thanks (: they haven't done nothing with the next so I just built it for them. Some breeders do it cause their hens don't do their own nests. Is that okay that I built it? Thanks for the info

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Yes, I do the same. I always build them and let them either tear them apart and redo them or simply use the one I did. Either way I make it and give it and then leave it to them!

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