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  1. #26
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5borders View Post
    Yes, I do the same. I always build them and let them either tear them apart and redo them or simply use the one I did. Either way I make it and give it and then leave it to them!
    Oh okay thanks I did that hope this works. Have you already had your first egg this season?

  2. #27
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    I've tried looking in the Internet for this but I couldn't find anything. Do they need to be in a quiet place? Cause mine are in the dinning room next to the kitchen and living room. It's only quiet Mondays - Fridays, 7 A.M - 3:30 P.M . After that the tv is always on except after 12:30 A.M and it's noisy except at night. Would they still breed? Or they need their quiet space?

  3. #28
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    I've noticed there was a mirror on the left side of the cage! My hen would always look at it and chirp. It's not really clear cause their is some stuff blocking the way. But I think you could still see yourself a bit. Would this be why she doesn't want to mate? Cause she's in love with herself? Plus I can't move the mirror it's like a cabinet with mirrors glued to the back.

  4. #29
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    When it comes to canaries, do not give them mirrors, they do nothing but cause problems. Simple answer is yes, birds don't understand the reflection all they see is another bird period. The noise is not a problem as long as it is not anything frighting or sudden. Normal activity in the house is fine, they get used to it. Just cover the cage at night and un-cover in the morning. TV's or the constant changing of images are a big disturbance. To a bird they are like strobe lights. Never put a bird facing a TV. Lastly, if your kitchen is close to the bird or the bird to the kitchen remember teflon cooking pans kill. Look it up under Birds and Non Stick Teflon cooking pans. The chemical make up of these oans lets out a toxin when used that will kill your bird/birds. I will add a little more to where your bird is. Try to keep any loud or abrupt activities out of the birds area when they are breeding. Most of the time you will have no problem, but the occasional dog or loud children or any typr of activity that can startle them can affect them during breeding.

  5. #30
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5borders View Post
    When it comes to canaries, do not give them mirrors, they do nothing but cause problems. Simple answer is yes, birds don't understand the reflection all they see is another bird period. The noise is not a problem as long as it is not anything frighting or sudden. Normal activity in the house is fine, they get used to it. Just cover the cage at night and un-cover in the morning. TV's or the constant changing of images are a big disturbance. To a bird they are like strobe lights. Never put a bird facing a TV. Lastly, if your kitchen is close to the bird or the bird to the kitchen remember teflon cooking pans kill. Look it up under Birds and Non Stick Teflon cooking pans. The chemical make up of these oans lets out a toxin when used that will kill your bird/birds. I will add a little more to where your bird is. Try to keep any loud or abrupt activities out of the birds area when they are breeding. Most of the time you will have no problem, but the occasional dog or loud children or any typr of activity that can startle them can affect them during breeding.

    No they are not facing the tv. About the kitchen yes I know I looked that up before I bought them. We don't have any of those pans

  6. #31
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Well actually we do have like two but I think they are far from them and the stove is also kind of far from the cages .

  7. #32
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Sounds good. Sorry I forgot to answer the, "do I have my first eggs of the season", question. My first round yielded 62 young. Some are still on eggs but 62 hatched out and growing well. Always lose a few but so far all is good. Banding is beginning, which makes for a lot of work, but I'm used to it. Banding can be stressful if you've never done it, but for me it is old hat and I have an assembly line type of approach, which makes easy work of it. For you or anyone reading this, my approach is as follows.
    Have new nests ready to go. Pick a cage around 5pm-6pm, about an hour from lights out. Grab the old nest with babies in it, and remove the whole thing from the cage. Bring it to a place were you are set up with a new nest and all materials. Take the first baby in hand and mark down the band number and nest information with a short description of the baby. Take a dab of Bacitracin ointment and palce it inside the band opening. Now slather a dab on the babies right foot/toes and ankle. This will assist in sticking the toes together so one does not squirt out. Nothing is more frustrating than fighting the toes as the baby curls them up. Now slide the band over the toes while holding the back sigle toe back against the leg.Wiggle the band over the toes and up the leg, until in place. The Bacitracine assists in lubricating the leg and toes, holding the together and easing the application. The other benifit is if any scratches occur the ointment is a assists keeping it clean and healing if a scratch occurs. Now repeat the process until the whole nest and all young in it are complete. Now place them all in the new nest and replace them and the new nest back into the cage. Now refill all the food in the cage. The parents will see the food and want to feed the young before bed time and because they now are concentrtaing on feeding they forget about the intrusion. It will be really close to dark now and they all go to bed and wake up forgetting all about the event and carry on normally with banded babies and a fresh new nest.

  8. #33
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5borders View Post
    Sounds good. Sorry I forgot to answer the, "do I have my first eggs of the season", question. My first round yielded 62 young. Some are still on eggs but 62 hatched out and growing well. Always lose a few but so far all is good. Banding is beginning, which makes for a lot of work, but I'm used to it. Banding can be stressful if you've never done it, but for me it is old hat and I have an assembly line type of approach, which makes easy work of it. For you or anyone reading this, my approach is as follows.
    Have new nests ready to go. Pick a cage around 5pm-6pm, about an hour from lights out. Grab the old nest with babies in it, and remove the whole thing from the cage. Bring it to a place were you are set up with a new nest and all materials. Take the first baby in hand and mark down the band number and nest information with a short description of the baby. Take a dab of Bacitracin ointment and palce it inside the band opening. Now slather a dab on the babies right foot/toes and ankle. This will assist in sticking the toes together so one does not squirt out. Nothing is more frustrating than fighting the toes as the baby curls them up. Now slide the band over the toes while holding the back sigle toe back against the leg.Wiggle the band over the toes and up the leg, until in place. The Bacitracine assists in lubricating the leg and toes, holding the together and easing the application. The other benifit is if any scratches occur the ointment is a assists keeping it clean and healing if a scratch occurs. Now repeat the process until the whole nest and all young in it are complete. Now place them all in the new nest and replace them and the new nest back into the cage. Now refill all the food in the cage. The parents will see the food and want to feed the young before bed time and because they now are concentrtaing on feeding they forget about the intrusion. It will be really close to dark now and they all go to bed and wake up forgetting all about the event and carry on normally with banded babies and a fresh new nest.

    It's okay. What do you do with all the birds?! And how many do you have? It seems like a lot you don't keep them in your house do you? Thanks

  9. #34
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    No I have an aviary outside that is 30'x60' that houses my breeding cages and flight cages. The question is a very good one in that most people do not think about the footprint or work it takes to handle what you have. If you have 2 pairs you could have 20 birds in one season if you are not watching. I start every year with 20 pairs and 4 spare foster hens. This number has been arrived at thru many years of what works best for me, defined as how much work and time I have available and how much space do I have to make sure what I have to do and their health can handle. Thru the years I have become known and many people ask for specific birds as well as what I breed to show. I adjust my flock according to what people want and what makes me happy as it concerns showing birds. I breed type and color no song. I also specialize in new colors so genetics and breeding is very speciic an concern to matching and pairing. It takes a lot of time to get your head wrapped around genetics and traits invloved. Meaning specific mutations happen all the time, it is a natural occurance. Most of the mutations are internal and never seen. External ones are rare but do occur so looking for traits involved to match and propigate those traits takes a keen eye and a lot of learned experience. Most bools on genetics talk ij circles and are written in a way that puts people to sleep. Many others are given fact, ie never breed an intensive bird to an intensive bird, rather you breed a non intensive to an intensive. It has everything to do with feathering and avoiding none genetic problems. To non intensive birds and you run the rick of feather cysts and lumps as well as bad coloring, two intensive birds and you introduce the lethal factor within the birds, meaning most will not hatch or will die. Intensive is just another way of saying hard feathered and non intensive is saying soft feathered. It applies to genetics the same as us. Meaning if a blond, blue eyes person concieves a baby with a dark haired , brown eyed person, the baby will have dark hair and dark eyes, because the melinan (dark pigmient) is dominant over the lipochrome,(the lighter pigment) Same applies to us, dogs, cats you name it. Thus in this explination red factor birds, you always breed a intensive red factor to a frosted red factor, (hard to soft feather). Gloster canaries, you always breed a corona to a consort, crested to non crested. Obviosuly color or feather type also applies to the Glosters but the crest is the primary as is the head size and body shape. OK, sorry way to much maybe, but I wanted to expand on what is involved accross the board in breeding needs. When people just throw two birds together for the sake of breeding, there are many things they should know or be aware of. Birds like life always includes the ever growing knowledge of whats and why's. Still today, the old adage of the more I learn the less I know applies. It is an ever changing story, but much is known as facts, the rest experience fills in. All of these thing go directly to why I breed how many I do. Many people want specific birds with known blood lines, thus I can provide that because every bird I have and have had, I have bred. My flock or aviary is a closed one, meaning I do not bring any into it for my flocks benifit. I have show winners and have bred specifically for the best. Don't get me wrong, that took years and a lot of very specific attention to details and health. If someone wants to breed new color birds, say Ino, Isabel, Satinets, Opals, Pastels ect I can supply them with hedrozigots or splits to the specific color or the new color itself. That goes back to genetis again. If you breed two pure together, OK but not good in the long term, you really should breed a carrier ro split of the trait to a full. Defined as say an opal, a bird split to the opal trait to a full visable opal. I hope this does not confuss you but what I am trying to do is make your mind go to understanding, there is much more to breeding than most know. Don'y try and absorb it all it will hurt your head, just be aware there is much to it and anyone doing it should be the exception to everyone else. Meaning learn and do it right if you're going to do it at all. Experiments are ok to prove or learn facts but remember, you are experiemnting on living creatures, don't take that lightly. My definition of experiments means with colors not health issues. No bird is hurt when you miss match thing, you just end up with a healthy bird that is variegated or not physically correct in respect to color or type. These we call Kitchen Canaries. No kitchen canary will ever make it on a show bench. When we speak of showing or show bench we are only talking about if your going to breed, do it right and do it to best you can, thus you breed only the best which also means healthiest. Wow, this got long, sorry, you appear to be young so I am being way more indepth than I usually would. No offense I hope by saying your young, just trying to help. I do highly suugest reading about genetics. It is fascinating but do not get frustrated. I have read books 10 times, over and over, to understand it. Again can be mind numbing but when it clicks, oh my it is incredably cool. Simple idea. Not now but later, maybe when your birds are molting, pull or gather different feathers. Hold then under a magnifying glass and examine them closely. Read up on feather tyoes before doing it and them look at them. You will see so much more that very few ever see.These are the things only 5% get or understand. Birds are incredable beings, living dinasours as some say, but remarkable in evolutionary beings. Hey, every fighter jet was directly engineered after emense studies of bird and flight dinamics.

  10. #35
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    You must have some loooong experience with Canaries. Yes, I've read about that. I also read that you can't mate a dominant white canary with another one. I was so lucky I found that video on YouTube before I bought a white dominant female (because I already had a white dominant male and wanted white canaries) and it said that if you wanted some white canaries you could breed a white dominant with a yellow canary. Which ive seen on YouTube most birds they're breeding are a white female and a yellow male. My female is yellow and my male is white. I was wondering would they have a yellow male and white female? Don't most genes come from the male? So I thought I was pretty lucky that I had a white male cause I thought most would be white. Do you have a YouTube account? Well Michelle from the "Canary Place" recommended me to separate them again for two weeks. So I did its been three days and I actually think they are starting to like each other (a bit) but when ever the male sings and tries to go mate with the female. The female gets as close as she can to him opens her beak and tries to bite him. I feel like my male canary is like a teenager he doesn't understand that if he keeps getting closer she will try to fight him. Michelle told me that my hen did want nothing to do with him but just wait a little longer and she will get in breeding condition. Would you say the same thing? I also gave them a little more privacy. I covered the side where the hen could see me so now she can't see me and I can't see her. Well only if I go in front of them. This is getting quite long. What do fruits and vegetables do you give your canaries? Also what do you do to bring both the male and female in breeding condition?

  11. #36
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    My male has been kind of acting weird. I've caught my male sitting on the cup twice since I separated them but the weird thing is he sits on the cups when the hen sits in them too. I'm worried that he's sick. He's been singing and chirping. He's been chirping a lot today. I think he's been acting normal it's just that sitting in the cup with the hen I'm wondering about.

  12. #37
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    I would agree with Michelle. What you described makes me worry he may be a she, not conclusive but curious. Some young of either sex will mimic the other in the attempt to pair. Sourt of like if we anted to learn or blend in we may mimic the behaviors of whomever we are trying to fit in with or applying behavior associated with blending or being accepted. If he lays eggs, you'll know. Do also study up on egg binding. First I am not saying this is occuring at all, just saying you should know the signs of such an event. If one sees a bird all of a sudden on the cage floor, mouth open and appears to be in distress, specific action must be taken. Number one cause is lack of Calcium. The bird can not pass the egg due to formation problems. In this case the egg is usually not fully developed and may be what appears to look like a soft gel pill. It will be shaped as an egg but the outer shell will be semi clear and very soft like a cod liver oil pill or the like. The bird can not pass it thus it is bond and the bird can die from this or from exhaustion from the attempt of passing it. Please please do not due anything of old school ways like putting the bird over a pot of boiling water or the like. You will find that a lot on line and is old school before advancments proved what to do. Again Michelle is correct in her breeding readiness call. Yes, lighting is number one to bringing them into condition, again 13.5 hours is good, but must be at that amount of time for a few weeks. Egg food also will bring them into it but can "push" them before actually ready. Meaning they start laying before they are actually fully ready physically. Her overies and his sperm count must achieve the breeding level. Egg food can make them mentally beleive its time but physically they are not ready, thus they mate and she lays but his spermcount is not there thus clear eggs are laid or dud's, non fertilized ones. LAstly, good work on the Dominant white learning. Yes, that applies accross the board as to what I stated, intensive as I spoke of can be conserderd as the dominant and rescessive as the soft or nonintensive gene. This applies to all birds of both sexes. The only truth in that is the female "only" will will outwardly show the true colors or genetic make up. The male hides some and will not show them all the time outwardly, or to our eye. The only way to tell is to look deep in the feather itself to see the traits I mentioned in a previous thread. With a dominant white and yellow bird mating there are rules but they are averages acroos to come up with a percentage of say 100 pairs to create an average. This does not help or apply to just one pair, meaning I could say you will get out of say 4 young from this pair, 1 - yellow, 1 white and 2 frosted yellow but in truth you will get birds who all carry the dominant wite gene and be able to pass it on. White is alwyas dominant over yellow. Thus on a clutch of 4 eggs you may or may not get what I just said. You may get all yellow frosted, (light yeelow, not intensive) or you may get one white bird. Even the dominant white you will get will have a fleck of yellow running donw the outer most line of the birds wings. No worries this is a tell tale sign of a dominant white. Recessives will generally be more white or lacking the yellow tinge. Back to sex and a part of your question. Note for all time, birds are opposite of us humans. Female birds carry the sex gene, or determinant gene, they carry the x and y chromosome. Males carry two x chromosomes thus the female carries the y to create a male bird. Humans are obviously opposite, the male carries the y for us. Now I am up to what I spoke about yesterday as the cuffusing part. By rule or genetic statistics if your female is yellow and your male white the rules would say on am average of 4 eggs only 2 or 3 females and 1 or 2 males / 2 carriers for white and two yellows. Carriers meaning not all white but a cross carrying the gene. Those birds then are what you would use to mate with a white bird so as to craete a genetic make up to produce the best and healthiest whites. Now lastly I don't want you to do this or anyone but it occurs and want you to know it in sace you read it somewhere. Some prominant breeders will pair two dominant whites together on purpose. Yes the lethal factor is in play when doing so. They know this and just accept it as a given. They know most of the young will not live but the ones that do live will be show winners as in excellent white birds in appearance. General rule is out of a clutch of 4 eggs 2 may make it but usually only one. This bird will be an incredable looking bird and can and does win shows. Well if that is what they are after, not me to judge them. The truth is these breeders have so many birds they don't care. The perect show winner may look great but may also have very bad genes and most likely be hindered physically in many ways, health, feahering and future breeding. Meaning you would not want to breed this bird again unless you bred it back to a yellow bird. It is a quick and lazy way of creating a perfect white. They may win with the bird but the bird pays the price.

  13. #38
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Yes, I was thinking the same thing! What if he is a female, but then I started to realize things I mean he sings and tries mating with her. He chirps different from the female. That would be a good explanaition what if hes trying to act like a female. If he is, would he still mate with her? Yes, I have heard about egg binding. They haven't mated so I don't think so. The female isn't in breeding condition either. Yesterday I checked and she doesn't have anything. I don't really think the male is a female and I pray he isn't. I'm worried that the breeder was probably selling them cause they wouldn't breed or something. He recommended me to breed the male when I first got him with the yellow female. He's a great friend and we've known him for years. You know how the hens (I think is the stomach or is it the vent?) is red and swollen showing she's in breeding condition. Shouldn't it be featherless? If it is I'm getting pretty happy because today I have seen 2 feathers on the bottom of her cage. I don't know if they probably just fell, but if they didn't. I'm getting happy because what if she's getting in breeding condition!
    I uncover their cages at about 6:30-40 A.M and cover them at like 10 P.M but it gets dark at 7:30 P.M that would be about 13 hours of sunlight. Is that okay? Also should I cover their cages right when it's getting dark or when we're about to go to sleep?

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    This might sound dumb, but would YouTube videos get the hen in breeding condition? Like playing baby birds crying for food, or a male canary singing?

    The hen has been on her nest a lot today but she's not building it or anything she just stands on the outside of it.

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    I've also seen/heared the male chirping softly to the hen and then the hen opens her beak (I think he feeds her) but shouldn't the hen be the one chirping softly? On this one video it showed the female singing. Could I just think the male is singing when in reality it's the female?

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    I feel kind of rude, but are you supposed to let your hen bathe? Most people let them during breeding process but I don't get it, why? Also how many times a day/week/month? I just don't get this? Also do they need it when they are sitting on the nest and when the birds hatch?

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    So Today I was feeling kind of hot, I thought it was just me about 20 minutes later I saw the thermometer and it said 79 degrees! I was so scared cause the canaries aren't supposed to be above 74 degrees to breed. I was so scared I was panicking. So I turned it off and opened the windows now it's at 76 it's been almost 2 hours. Will this affect them?! Please help!

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    It sounds like both are actually acting fine. Remember some hens or both can be terrible nest builders. Not unusual for birds to be bad nest builders, or to even build one at all. This is why we sometimes make them for them, keeping in mind they may tear them apart. Can be frustrating but again if you have a nest liner in the nest no worries. If he is feeding her it is a very good sign. Role reversals as in that he is yielding to her dominance is fine. Think of it two ways, one he's a gentleman and you have a good male who will be attentive to all of her and the young's needs. Two, he is a gentleman and also a player, HA, meaning he do anything needed to mate. Sorry, but guys will be guys, no matter what species. The truth is as long as they are not fighting, things will work out. Don't worry about the temperature. When people or articles talk about "ideal", in this case 74/76 as the ideal temp for breeding, it is just that, ideal. Defined as the best but not necessary. Mine are outside in a huge outdoor aviary in Florida, they lay and raise young well into the 90's. Your benefit is they will never get that hot which works better to avoid problems do to high temps and high humidity, ie molds/fungus and viruses due to moisture and heat. The lighting to bring them in must be 13 to 14 for them to hit full stride, whatever you do must hit that mark. I always suggest if you are extending the time, make it work around your own schedule, they will adjust and it makes your life easier. Just never do it or adjust it to abruptly, it should always be done gradually. Most breeders start increasing the timing in 15 minute adds, starting in January until they reach the 13.5 by mid February. If you are looking for readiness, turn her over and blow her feathers gently up toward her head. You will see the breeding patch best that way. It will be about dine to nickel size, showing bare skin. If it is there it should also be warm to touch. Use the back side of one of your fingers to tell. Lastly go on line and look up eggs. Anything related to discussing the egg itself. Most articles will be on chickens, that's fine, same principle for all birds/eggs. You will see an incredible thing that we call the egg. The outer shell and inner workings are a biological wonder. Air and especially moisture matter very much. The eggs pores are there on purpose to bring air and moisture in and air and moisture out. Everything inside is there to sustain the growing chick and it requires air and moisture to enter and then removes the toxins or spent air and moisture after use. The bath for instance is needed, "sometimes". Relative humidity in the air should be around 65 pct. This is again ideal, but not needed to be consistent. If the air around the egg is bad it will affect the growing chick, defined like; if someone is smoking around the eggs the smoke will be pulled in and the chick is breathing it also or affected, same with dirt or fungal particulates if the cage is dirty. The major issue is moisture, to little and the young will die in the egg. They will actually stick to the side of the egg and thus its over. To much and they can drown. Don't over think this or due abrupt adjustments, if the cage is inside and you feel fine, most likely so will be the eggs. If your running the heater in the house for obvious reasons to warm you, you are drying the air, heat dry's. If your house is to dry you will feel it as well, eyes, throat ect. When you get dried out your eyes itch or feel dry and so does your throat, lips ect. This is generally why you feel better after going outside during the winter and you've been inside with the heat running. It affects the eggs the same way but they can not get away from it and dry out, thus die. Some will even get stuck to the inside and still pip or crack the egg shell trying to hatch but can't because they got stuck. Anyway, read up on the incredible egg, it really is extraordinary in how it is designed.

  19. #44
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    I did think of something you stated. You said the person you recieved the male from said to breed him quickly or right when you got him. I say this because this is associated with what I said about getting the irds used to your own schedule. I let everyone know how I breed my birds, when and all aspects. Meaning I don't push mine and don't pair them up until much later than most people. Many reasons but for this aspect, if the person you recieved the bird from mates his early, say January and told you to breed him as soon as you got him, he may of been warning you. I would ask him when he sets his birds up and everything he does to breed them. Just like birds coming into readiness they also go out of it after a period. There are things you can do to sustain their breeding readiness but for health reasons only so much. Usually vitamin e or as most breders use: wheat germ. Do be careful with it tho, it can make birds very aggresive if over done. Ask the person about his breeding program and why he said to mate that bird quickly.

  20. #45
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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Oh okay thanks , no I don't feel like the house is dry. Yes, I know somewhat much about the egg I used to have and breed chickens but I switched to canaries. Well he told me that the breeding season was almost over so I was getting kind of worried. I mean didn't it just start? I'm guessing he started around January. He doesn't really like talking about his breeding. We bought out dog with him because he also breeds dogs. My dad asked him about his dogs and he wouldn't talk about it at all. He doesn't really like talking about anything, not the food he gives them, water, etc. Thanks today has been 1 week that they have been separated each time by male sings he goes back and forth and climbs on the cage the hens reaction she also climbs on the cage they both flap their wings and I haven't really seen this anymore but in the beginning she would still open her beak. Now I haven't really been able to see if she still opens

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    -- it, but I think she does. Are dogs a problem?

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Oh yes and my canaries have been more active than usual. They chirp and move around more.

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    No dogs are not a problem as long as they can not get face to face with the birds or bang the cages. Most dogs are just curious and never show signs of wanting to harm so the birds usually are alright. I even have a cat who likes to climb on the cages every now and then. He could care less about the birds, just wants to be high up. He has done it so often the birds don't even pay attention except for the shaking cages and water spills he causes. Every once in a while he even stands and tries the face to face thing, they just pick at his nose and he losses interest after a while. Funny thing is he can stare at the large fight cages for hours but birds in cages don't interest him. Movement I guess

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    Oh lol, so I haven't really had any trouble, but should the nest be made before or after the male is with the hen? Or it doesn't matter? On this website it said before but I don't think it really matters? I made my hen her own nest (long time ago) well she's starting to throw the nesting material on the floor. (playes with the nesting material) should I make it again or just leave nesting material in the cage and just wait till she makes it?

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    Re: Are my Canaries ready to breed?

    The progresion is as follows
    1- Place both birds in a double breeder cage, with the partition in it to keep them seperated. If you do not have one, use two cages next to each other
    2- Leave them alone this way for a week and watch as they get used to each other. This builds the courtship
    3- When the MAle is flying back and forth and singing loudly he is stimulated
    4- When the hen is staying close as she can to his side she is beginning to accept him
    5- When it appears they are sitting close and showing interest in each other it is time to put them in the same cage. Sometimes this is easy to see if he is feeding her through the cage
    6- Place her in his cage and watch. Let them get used to each other and watch for any agression
    7- After a couple of days add the nest
    8- They both should start building or playing with nesting material. Yes, I always make a nest for them, but all bets are off after that what they will do with it. Just take a clip of some sourt and clip some nesting material to the cage for them to use if they wish. As before the nest has a nest liner you put in so if they boch the building process all is ok.
    9- Depends on the pair but you should see building and her begin to fly in front of him and flit her wings. He will be singing strong and following her around. Whn she is ready she will let him know, she will drop her head, flit her wings and raise her rear. This tells him, come on and he will fly over jump up on her back and in seconds move off again. This will occur multiple times but rarely back to back. Maybe around 3 times in a day. If all goes well you will see her messing with the nest and laying in a few days or a week.
    10- She will not sit until the 2nd or 3rd egg is laid. When she does he should be feeding her. This does not happen all the time but is the best when he does.
    11- Count 14 days from when she is sitting tight and start looking for hatchling around day 13 or 14.
    Obviously this is the perfect scenerio and happens about 65% of the time, but birds like us, we are all different so problems and personalities do throw curve balls.

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